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Mastering Money

Tune into one of the best retirement shows on the radio! Mastering Money is hosted by Certified Income Specialist™ and best selling author, Steve Jurich (pronounced Jur-itch). Steve is an experienced 20 year veteran of financial services and is licensed in securities, insurance, and real estate. He is a Certified Annuity Specialist® who reviews up to 2700 annuities on a regular basis. As a fiduciary, Steve’s clients enjoy access to the services of Fidelity Institutional, member FINRA, SIPC.
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Now displaying: Page 84

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Jan 8, 2016

Regulators have long worried that the nature of leveraged ETFs—which are meant to be traded intraday, not even held overnight—was too confusing for many investors, who would hold them too long, not aware of the lethal time decay of the assets being acquired.
ProShare Advisors and Direxion Shares, the two competing leveraged ETF providers, say that these funds aren’t intended to be held without close monitoring. In straight up or straight down markets, the leveraged ETF strategy can work very well. But in any up and down volatile market, leveraged ETFs can be a disaster. The Securities and Exchange Commission has long contended that investors in leveraged ETFs are “confused about the performance objectives.” They are unaware of the derivative positions that either work or don't work on a daily basis, which can result in permanent losses and internal decay of the fund. Steve and Sinclair review how these tricky ETFs work and why the SEC is taking some action. In the Q & A segment, Steve reviews some key points on annuity misconceptions. Parts of this show were heard on Tuesday January 5.

Jan 7, 2016

Amazon is in a fierce battle to become a major player in India—with some local competition in its way that isn’t exactly chopped liver.

Jeffery Bezos, CEO of Amazon, has his foot to the floorboard in a race to capture the trust of the Indian buying public, entering the scene some five to nine years later than Flipkart and Snapdeal, which have become billion dollar companies while the rest of the world was sleeping. Fortune.com reports that much of the infrastructure for doing business in India is having to be built from scratch by Amazon, tossing out practices it has taken for granted for decades.

In India, Amazon is an upstart, and is in a knife fight with two privately owned and much more established Indian competitors—Flipkart Internet Pvt. and Snapdeal, owned by Jasper Infotech Pvt.—as well as a clutch of smaller Indian startups that are nipping at all of their heels.

Steve and Sinclair review the challenge and the opportunity that Amazon India is taking on. In the Q & A segment, estate planning attorney Richard Dwornik, part of the IQ Wealth team, joins the A-team to discuss the finer points of general durable powers of attorney.

Jan 6, 2016

Hedged mutual funds built around managed futures have been appearing in many investors retirement accounts in recent years, but are they panning out?
Fees can be extremely high and many of the funds have lost 20% to 30% with only a few winners.
The Wall Street Journal reports that these funds are suddenly closing down at a rapid pace. You may want to check your portfolio to see if you own some of these pricey dogs.

Managed futures accounts, smart beta, and hedge fund clones had a rough time of it in 2015.More “liquid alternative” mutual funds closed in 2015 than in any year on record according to Morningstar Inc. Inflows dwindled and performance weakened.

The results show that enthusiasm is fading for what had emerged in recent years as one of the hottest products in asset management—funds that combine hedge-fund strategies like shorting stock with the daily liquidity of mutual funds.

In all, 31 liquid-alternative funds shut their doors in 2015. Steve and Sinclair dig into the subject with some key statistics.

In the Q & A, CFP® and Certified Investment Management Specialist® Murray Titterington with IQ Wealth joins the A-Team to report on the alarming trend of overleveraging by U.S. companies. Many are borrowing money to pay their dividends. Can it end well? Hear the facts. Steve gives some important advice to conservative and moderate retirement investors in segments 3 and 4.

Jan 5, 2016

Leveraged exchange-traded funds—the "hot rods" of the trading world—have long drawn the ire of regulators keen on investor protection. Chris Dieterich, writing for Barrons recently, pointed out that newly proposed rules to curtail the use of derivatives in funds could eradicate the racier products in this $27 billion ETF industry.

Regulators have long worried that the nature of leveraged ETFs—which are meant to be traded intraday, not even held overnight—was too confusing for many investors, who would hold them too long, not aware of the lethal time decay of the assets being acquired.
ProShare Advisors and Direxion Shares, the two competing leveraged ETF providers, say that these funds aren’t intended to be held without close monitoring. The Securities and Exchange Commission has long contended that investors in leveraged ETFs are “confused about the performance objectives.”

Professional trader Aaron Levitt, writing on ETFdb.com, pointed out that structured, leveraged ETFs provide an amplified return for a single day. Just one. If you have a string of great days with no major switchbacks (volatility) they work. Then they reset and provide that same amplified return for the next day. Levitt says that’s the biggest misconception ma

Many investors have about leverage ETFs. They assume that if the index is up 8% for the year, then their 2x leveraged ETF will be up 16%. That simply is not how they work--Steve and Sinclair review leverage ETFs, how they really work, and WHEN they really work.

In the Q & A segment, Steve points out two key reasons why retiring professionals are changing their approach to IRA rollovers. He then takes a look at professional trader Jared Woodard's analysis of the coming year. Important points.

Jan 4, 2016

Happy New Year!
Steve and Sinclair review the news on a day where the markets opened with a downward bang.
Nick Grovich stops in to talk about the precious metals outlook.
Steve reviews the difference a hundred years can make:
The average life expectancy for men was 49.6 years and for women 54.3 years. Today, at birth its 81.2 years females ; for males, it's 76.4 years, among the fastest growing age groups are the 80s and 90s
In 1916, fuel for cars was sold in drug stores only. Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub. Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone, yet
eighteen percent of households had at least one full-time servant or domestic help.

Most women only washed their hair once a month and used Borax or egg yolks for shampoo.
Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from entering into their country for any reason.

The population of Las Vegas, Nevada was 30.

A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year.
A dentist made $2,500 per year. They charged $1.00 per filling.
A veterinarian made between $1,500 and $4,000 per year.
And, a mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year, twice the dentist

Which assets have never lost money in those 100 years?

Check out Mastering Money for details

 

Dec 31, 2015

Truck-driver teams have emerged as the shipping heroes of the holidays.

According to Loretta Chao, reporting for the Wall Street Journal, retailers and parcel carriers found themselves turning more than ever to driving teams this season, in which drivers pair up to keep trucks rolling for hundreds of miles over 20 or more hours a day.


Gary Helms, a 57-year-old driver said “The goal would be for this truck to never stop,”. He has hauled freight for companies including Amazon.com Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc., and FedEx Corp..

Estimates point to far faster growth in Web orders than in sales at brick-and-mortar stores this year and years ahead. That has pressured the operations at United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx, to put on extra staff to handle the surge.


Husband-and-wife teams increasingly are becoming common, but that too presents its own set of challenges. Kim Pagh, 45, who has been driving with her husband, Jay, for eight years, said they have spent many Christmases and anniversaries on the road. Several times, they were stuck minding loads in empty lots on Christmas Day without access to running water because no one showed up at the dock to let them unload. Steve and Sinclair review this intriguing story.

In the Q & A segment, Steve answers the some of the most pressing questions on annuities, including how they are constructed, which ones are safe, and what exactly makes them safe.

Dec 30, 2015

Few people realize how large the economic impact of charities has become in our country. The media tends to paint a picture of a "big, bad America who takes but never gives", yet the United States is unquestionably the most generous nation the world has ever known. Ameircans give and are happy to do it.

Do charities, churches, and non-profits have a positive effect on the economy? Without charities and non-profits and the work they do, America wouldn’t shut down, but the effect on the economy would be huge because government red tape would never be able to keep up with the speed that Charitable organization exhibit in handling pressing problems—from day care for working moms, to after school programs for teens, to food to feed the hungry, seven days a week.

Last year, total giving was more than $358 billion from records provided by Giving USA Foundation numbers, which tracks total philanthropic activity. Steve and Sinclair explore the impact of charitable giving on the economy, and which parts of the country give more than others.

In the Q & A segment, CFP® Murray Titterington with IQ Wealth joins the A-Team to talk about required minimum distributions from traditional, inherited, and roth IRAs.

Happy New Year!

Dec 29, 2015

The year is ending, and so is the opportunity to make final tax moves for 2015. Before you do, beware of subtleties in the tax rules that bring both opportunities and pitfalls, says Laura Saunders writing for the Wall Street Journal.

Today we do a round-up of late year tax moves in both segments 2 and 3. In segment 2, Steve and Sinclair review 6 tax moves that can have a significant impact on your 2015 taxes according to two tax attorneys , and the "gottcha's" that could nullify the deduction.

CPA Nick Stefaniak joins the A Team to tie a bow on last minute tax planning, depreciation, and the perils of the Alternative Minimum Tax.

Dec 28, 2015

In the past 12 months, companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 have doled out nearly $1 trillion to shareholders in the form of both dividends and stock buybacks, the highest level since 2007. For years, hedge fund managers have been big proponents of share buybacks.

Hedge fund managers are suddenly changing their tunes.

They know that the economy will begin to affect the stock market more and more as the effect of buybacks gets watered down. When the only objective is higher stock price, money management suffers at major corporations.

U.S. corporations have taken on record levels of debt for all the wrong reasons--they borrow the money at two or three percent, then turn around and buy back shares to shrink the supply. Even though the demand for a stock may stay flat, the lower supply can raise the stock price. Corporations are no longer using the money to expand or create jobs, which is bad for long term trends. Steve and Sinclair review a timely article by Sarah Max of Barrons on the subject.

In the Q & A, Steve answers some hard questions on annuities and income planning, clearing up some important aspects of when annuities may or may not be appropriate.

Dec 24, 2015

The Masters of the Universe don’t all live on Wall Street anymore. In fact you could say that the masters have become minions. The big banks and big fixed income bond traders ruled the markets in the old days. Bonds have become almost a dead issue and layoffs in bond departments at Morgan Stanley and others are rampant.

Steve and Sinclair review a Wall Street Journal report on the shift in fortunes for Wall Street’s bond traders.

In the Q & A segment, estate planning attorney Richard Dwornik joins the A-Team to dissect when a trust should and should not be used as the beneficiary of the IRA.

In the final segment, Steve recalls the true story of how the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York got its first manager. Very interesting!

Oh, And, Merry Christmas!!

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