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Mastering Money

Mastering Money is hosted by Certified Income Specialist™ Steve Jurich. Steve's comments have been seen on MarketWatch, CNBC.com, Bloomberg, and TheStreet.com. Steve is joined on most days by Money Radio favorite Sinclair Noe as well as experts and authors from the world of Wall Street and real estate. New episodes published every weekday at 9am PST. Listen every weekday to get a handle on emerging market trends, asset allocation strategies, social security, medicare, RMD planning, tax strategies, estate planning, annuities, life insurance and more!
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Now displaying: February, 2016

Feb 12, 2016

Take a hypothetical investor named George who retired on Jan. 1, 2000, at age 65 with a $1 million all-stock portfolio, and spent $50,000 a year on his RLE, adjusted for inflation. Considering the S&P 500 lost 41.2% in nominal dollars (or 53.4% after inflation) between the day he retired and Feb. 28, 2009, George would have barely $100,000 left of his nest egg by the end of September 2014, with perhaps ten to twenty years to go for him and his wife. Steve and Sinclair review a Wall Street Journal article by former Neuro Surgeon turned financial analyst, William Bernstein. Bernstein developed a formula for calculating the amount of nest egg you need to retire, based on your Residual Living Expenses (RLE). Steve and Sinclair dig into it and more.

Feb 11, 2016

Passwords are ruling our lives, but here's the rub: hackers can break into virtually any system protected by a typed in password. New technology is on the way that will finally eliminate the password. Apple and Alphabet are working on it as we speak. We review a special report in the Wall Street Journal.

In the Q & A segment, CPA Nick Stefaniak joins the A-Team to review some of the 26 most overlooked tax deductions in the tax code.

Feb 10, 2016

Looking for predictors of stock market direction? How about butter production In Bangladesh? Not kidding, this is an indicator, along with the Super Bowl indicator, the ladies hemline indicator and others that actually have higher correlation success than many big name mutual fund manager predictions. According to its adherents, taking the change in butter production in Bangladesh and multiplying it by two will give you the exact percentage by which the S&P 500 Index will change in the year ahead. Steve and Sinclair review this indicator along with several others, including the "nationality-of-the-model-on-the-Cover-of-the-Sports Illustrated-bathing suit-issue indicator." (This indicator has outperformed the S & P considerably by the way.)

In the Q & A, Sinclair grills Steve with some tough questions on annuities and how they fit in today's retirement portfolios.

Feb 9, 2016

How helpful are mutual-fund rankings from research firms such as Morningstar Inc. and S&P Capital IQ? New evidence suggests that for many investors, the answer may be “not very.”
This according to a Wall Street Journal research piece submitted by Dr. John Payne and Dr. Shlomo Benartzi.

Dr. Benartzi is a professor and co-head of the behavioral decision-making group at UCLA Anderson School of Management. Dr. Payne is a professor at Duke University’s Fuqua business school.
Steve and Sinclair review this intriguing report.

In the Q & A segment, H & R Block Master Tax Advisor and Enrolled Agent Doris Milton joins the A Team to discuss some surprising facts about the medical expense tax deduction.

Feb 8, 2016

The China markets are closed for Lunar New Year and oil prices are lower again--its sending stock markets and oil down but one asset is up nearly 10% on the year: Gold.  Nationally known precious metals expert and author Nick Grovich joins the A-Team to talk about why 95% of gold investors don't make money--and how to become one of the 5% that do.

Feb 4, 2016

Many people hear the word “long-term care insurance” and think “nursing home.” The thought often ends there. Few want to end their life in a care facility, so why would they buy a product that enables them to do only that—wind up in a nursing home? Therefore, many people drop the idea or put it far on the back burner.

In reality, most people don't end up in an actual nursing home at the point that they start slowing down. All of us one day will face the prospect of needing some assistance with basic activities of daily living--but it all starts in your own home. Most people would prefer to stay in their own for as long as possible. It gets expensive, however. Care givers cost money. In fact, in home full time care can cost $8,000 a month on average. In home benefits are much more important to consider when you are looking at covering long term care contingencies in later life.
So, should you be buying an actual long term care policy? Is it worth it? And what are the alternatives? The good news is that there are a number of less expensive alternatives to long term care insurance. Steve and Sinclair review.

In the Q & A segment, estate planning attorney Richard Dwornik joins the A-Team to discuss the rising trend of pre-nuptial agreements for those remarrying in retirement.

 

Feb 3, 2016

Is your portfolio weighed down by Apple and other tech stocks? Are you wondering what's dragging them down?
It turns out that a surprisingly strong dollar ( in comparison to falling currencies world wide), is cutting deep into the bottom line for companies like Apple, Alphabet/Google, Oracle, and IBM.
Because tech companies now do more than half of their business overseas, currency wars are now a key element that must be calculated into portfolio construction.
Steve and Sinclair break down a Wall Street Journal report.

CFP® Murray Titterington with IQ Wealth Management, joins the A-Team for the Q &A. Topic: Dividend paying Utility Stocks and ETFs.

Feb 2, 2016

Do you feel jealous that you missed out on some big IPO deals? Maybe you got lucky after all. Once-highflying IPOs are wandering aimlessly in the wasteland of the public equity markets and understandably unloved by investors, say William Cohan writing for Fortune.

Many have familiar names, such as Zynga (down about 75% from its IPO price) Twitter (down 30%) , and Groupon (down 85%) . Online craft marketplace Etsy recently traded 56% below last year’s price at IPO and 77% under its first-day close. Others that are less well-known are out there, too—like Nimble Storage now 67% below IPO price and falling, round out a pathetic lineup. Steve and Sinclair review the IPO landscape.

Gary Kaultbaum joins the A-Team in segment 3 for a fast paced Q & A

Feb 1, 2016

Steve and Sinclair open with a review the markets after friday's big rise.
In segment 2, they dig into the estate planning fiasco of the late Robin Williams.
Even though Williams had a living trust and an irrevocable trust for some of his real estate, his kids and his second wife did not get along.
A number of issues arose that could have been avoided.

In segment 3, the Q & A, estate planning attorney Richard Dwornik joins the A-Team to review spendthrift provisions in living trusts.

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